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How Can I Prevent Shin Splints?
First of all, realize that shin splints are often caused from too much volume or repeated pounding on a hard surface or could be due to a muscular imbalance. Shin splints are actually the tearing away of the tibialis anterior or tibialis posterior muscles from the tibia and this causes a lot of inflammation and pain.
The following question was answered by Todd Durkin. Todd is the founder of Fitness Quest 10 & Todd Durkin Enterprises in San Diego, CA. He leads a staff of 26 employees, trains over 25 NFL athletes, and motivates companies, teams, and conferences throughout the country. 

I get shin-splints when I run. What can I do to prevent them?
First of all, realize that shin splints are often caused from too much volume or repeated pounding on a hard surface or could be due to a muscular imbalance. Shin splints are actually the tearing away of the tibialis anterior or tibialis posterior muscles from the tibia and this causes a lot of inflammation and pain. If left alone, it can develop into a very serious problem. Consult with your physician first if you have any questions regarding the severity of your injury. Left unattended, it can develop into conditions such as stress fractures that is very serious.

There are several things you can to do to prevent shin splints. First, invest in a good pair of walking shoes or running shoes to give your body adequate cushion when exercising.  Additionally, do replace your sneakers every 6 months or 300-500 miles of wear & tear.

If you are experiencing shin splints now, ice up the area several times a day for 20 minutes at a time. Stretch your calves thoroughly by pressing into a wall with one leg straight back or purchase a calf-roller. You can also get a foam roller and/or a massage stick to do some self myofascial release on the shin splints and on the calves. I often suggest massage and bodywork if the area isn’t too inflamed or have the therapist work on the calves, feet, and supporting structures to prevent compensatory injuries from occurring. Contact a qualified health care practitioner or physician for more information.  Good luck!
 
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